Antarctic video gallery

Dr Nick Gales: a unique Antarctic journey

Dr Nick Gales: a unique Antarctic journey

Video transcript

Dr Nick Gales, Director, Australian Antarctic Division:

I was incredibly fortunate that they were looking for a vertebrate ecologist to do some work on elephant seals that required administering anaesthesia, so my veterinary background was really a great strength for my application, I was very lucky.

Knowing now how important Antarctica is and then knowing what the consequences of climate change are to Antarctica and then looping back those influences on us is a key part of understanding what’s coming down in the future.

This whale finally surfaced and this huge wall of whale came up alongside me and I had no idea where on the body I was. It just kept passing me and I didn’t shoot the tag. I stood there completely dumbfounded as this animal just swam past us and looked. Then the driver was saying, “Why didn’t you shoot?” “I didn’t know where!”

[end transcript]

Natural born krillers video

Natural born krillers video

Video transcript

The Aurora Australis returned from Antarctica today with some very special passengers…

25 expeditioners, and ten thousand young Antarctic krill.

Krill are collected once a year in the Southern Ocean.

Once in Hobart, 200 kilos of party ice keep the krill cool at zero degrees.

Their new home is a unique lab at the Australian Antarctic Division.

Here we learn how they feed, grow, and deal with ocean acidification.

These krill are around a year old, and can live for up to ten years.

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Super-cooled clouds

Super-cooled clouds

Video transcript

Australian Antarctic Division Principal Research Scientist

Dr Andrew Klekociuk

It uses a laser beam to measure the height and the properties of clouds. The thing that we're most interested in is whether clouds are liquid or solid, whether they consist of water droplets or ice crystals.

That means that they influence the radiation coming from the sun in a different way to what we see in the Northern Hemisphere

When we calculate what the temperature of the Southern Ocean is in our model, we find it’s higher than we actually observe. We think that the liquid clouds in the Southern Hemisphere are implicated in causing that difference.

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Antarctic ice mission seeks mystery molecules that scrub sky

Antarctic ice mission seeks mystery molecules that scrub sky

Video transcript

Dr David Etheridge, CSIRO atmospheric physicist:

Law Dome is, I’d say unique, I don’t think we have any other site on the planet, either in Greenland or in Antarctica, that has these qualities. And so it provides us with an almost perfect place to go looking for these long-term changes in the atmospheric composition.


We understand from that a lot about how much has been emitted to the atmosphere to cause those levels. What we don’t understand is how much is being removed. And that removal process is fundamental to being able to predict the levels into the future.

Methane, for example, which is one of the most potent greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, to understand how that will change in the future under a certain emissions scenario depends on how much will be removed.

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Underwater cameras light the way for Southern Ocean conservation

Underwater cameras light the way for Southern Ocean conservation

Video transcript

Tim Lamb:

All around the Antarctic there are areas known as vulnerable marine ecosystems, and we're trying to find them, so that the fishing industry can avoid fishing on them.

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