This week at the station

This week at Davis: 10 January 2014

Drum crushing

The Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) is responsible for implementing the Australian Government's obligation to protect the Antarctic environment, as reflected in its vision for Antarctica as valued, protected and understood.

One of the key station aspects of our interaction with the environment is waste management. What that means to everyone on station is responsible waste management and the need to return all station waste to Australia.

One of the most gathered items on station and the hardest to return are the empty 200 litre fuel drums. To return them takes a lot of space on the ship and sometimes it is not possible to return all of the drums. Over a period of time the fuel drums at Davis stockpiled to an exceedingly large number. Problem – a large number of fuel drums; solution – a drum crusher. By crushing the drums it is possible to return to Australia eight drums in the space of one uncrushed drum.

One of the main tasks at Davis this year was the washing, crushing and readying for return to Australia of the gathered fuel drums and nearly everyone on station was expected and inducted to operate the drum crusher. Each drum takes about 6-8 minutes to be crushed and still weighs 22 kg. It is expected that all drums will be finished this summer and ready for return to Australia.

Two expeditioners standing next to a drum crusher
Reece and Kallum with one of the first drums to be crushed!
(Photo: Bill P)
The empty drum crusher next to a container of empty fuel drums.
The drum crusher and the first load, how many more!!
(Photo: Bill D)
Fuel drums covered in snow at Davis Station
Before being crushed they have to be dug out!
(Photo: Bill D)
Three crushed fuel drums in a shipping container
The first three drums crushed!
(Photo: Bill D)

Nick's cryptic cartoon

This week Nick has created another original cryptic cartoon. To help out with the answer it is worth noting that the cartoon’s source is Davis or Antarctic references, places or technical terminology at Davis. Good luck, and did anyone get the last one right? See the answer in next week’s edition of Icy News.

A cryptic cartoon by Davis resident artist, Nick. The cartoon shows a hand sticthing fabric with tiny trees and animals on the fabric.C
Nick's cryptic cartoon
(Photo: Nick.C)

Jingle Bells

For the authors of Icy News, there is nothing better than to know someone is reading your contributions. What's even better is when one of the expeditioners' mums writes a song incorporating the theme of our last edition of Icy News, which was playing golf on the sea ice golf course. Here is Craig's mum's song to be sung to the tune of Jingle Bells and what an appropriate time of year (Christmas) to receive it. Thanks Annie.

"Jingle Bells"

Especially Written For Antarctic Golf Addicts!

Golfing in the snow
with coloured balls and tees,
Drives are hard to contemplate
they bring me to my knees.

Iron on ice does ring
A clunky kind of tune,
Oh look here, I've bent my shaft
I'm fearing golf club ruin.

Oh… Juggled balls, tangled belts,
Jangle all the way,
Oh what fun it is to play
Golf, in the snow today.

*** (reprise if you wish)

We only have one hole,
and it is ringed in green
borrowed from the kitchen
some dye, so hole is seen.

Making my approach,
my grip has turned to ice,
The putter does it's own damned thing,
This AIN'T so very nice.

Oh… hells and bells, blooping game
Jiggered all the way
Oh what fun to dare to join,
this game of golf today.

*** (reprise if you wish)

Laughs replacing moans
Chucked clubs to be retrieved
Walking back to tee again
Somehow we seem relieved!

So we start again,
This time with great resolve
to show the world what ice golf is,
Antarctic sports evolve.

Wheee… Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells,
Tinkle all the way,
oh what fun it is to have
our mates with us today.

*** (reprise etc)

Written by Annie B ( Craig D's Mum )

A photo of an expeditioner.
Craig!
(Photo: Bill.D)

Christmas Day

Christmas time is always special, no matter where in the world you might be, and nowhere more than at Davis Station. The station goes through a lot of effort to make the day one to remember. A special thank you to the chefs Lesley, Gavin and Renato for their outstanding work in the kitchen and to all those that contributed on the day; the photo’s give an indication of the day.

Davis research station had the pleasure of hosting five Russian scientists for Christmas dinner, the scientists were working in the field at a group of islands not that far from station. Language was a slight barrier but one scientist was actually named Nick and with Saint Nicholas being the Russian version of Santa Claus it was agreed by all parties to simply call them all “Nick”. They had a wonderful time and after dinner they entertained us by singing some Russian songs.

A photo of the two chefs in the mess
Lesley and Renato
(Photo: Bill.D)
An expeditioner cooking a spit roast
Paul cooking the lamb for Christmas
(Photo: Bill.D)
A chef cutting up a whole cooked lamb in the kitchen
Renato cutting up the lamb spit for dinner
(Photo: Bill.D)
A chef preparing a turkey dish
Gav getting the turkey ready
(Photo: Bill.D)
An expeditioner ironing the table cloths
Ali getting the table cloths perfect!
(Photo: Bill.D)
Dining room set up for dinner, the walls lines with flags from around the world
The mess all set up for Christmas dinner, what a sight!
(Photo: Bill.D)
A group of plumbers singing in front of the Christmas tree
The plumbers singing Christmas carols
(Photo: Bill.D)
Five expeditioners dressed as Santa & his helpers
What is Christmas without Santa & his helpers!
(Photo: Bill.D)
A female expeditioner sitting on Santa's knee
Kimberley had been a good girl!
(Photo: Bill.D)
A photo of a seafood platter
A small sample of what was for Christmas Dinner
(Photo: Bill.D)
Photo of ginger bread houses and cakes
How much work did the chef's put in!
(Photo: Bill.D)
Five Russian expeditioners with Santa Clause
The six Nicks!
(Photo: Bill.D)
This page was last modified on 16 December 2010.