November 2022 | News from the Australian Antarctic Program

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Later this season, these tractor traverse trains will tow a mobile inland station to a remote ice-core drilling site, 1200 km from Casey research station and high on the Antarctic plateau. The mobile station will support scientists drilling for one million year old ice. Photo: Jason Lithgow

Antarctic season begins

Australia's Antarctic season opened with an air drop of mechanical parts by the RAAF, to help prepare the ice runway at Wilkins. This season will feature two deep-field science missions into remote parts of the frozen continent to help us understand the Earth’s past and present climate. The season will be supported by 7 voyages, 18 flights and 420 Antarctic expeditioners.

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Using AI to detect whale calls

Whale scientists could soon do themselves out of a job by applying artificial intelligence to their research. Using machine learning, the AI has trained itself to detect blue whale ‘D-calls’ in sound recordings, with greater accuracy and speed than human experts.

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Seabed 'jigsaw piece' released

Survey data from a vast underwater valley off East Antarctica, collected during RSV Nuyina’s first voyage, has been publicly released through AusSeabed. The 2300 m-deep, 2000 m-wide and more than 55 km-long valley, extends from underneath the Vanderford Glacier into the ocean.

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Dramatic decline in Adélie penguins near Mawson

Long-term monitoring has revealed a 43% decline in a large Adélie penguin population off the coast near Mawson research station, over the past decade.

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Jobs in Antarctica

Applications open for jobs in Antarctica on 8 November. Keep an eye on our jobs website for trades, telecommunications, infrastructure and station support roles.

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