Dr Philippe Ziegler

Dr Philippe Ziegler: PhD
Research Scientist: population modelling

Research interests

I studied biology at the University of Zurich in Switzerland before moving to Tasmania in 1998 to complete a PhD in fisheries biology, through the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI) at the University of Tasmania. After my PhD I continued work with TAFI on fish stock assessment modelling and management strategy evaluation in small-scale finfish and crustacean fisheries. I began also a project funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation on developing a management decision support tool for the Tasmanian scalefish industry. This tool will allow fishery managers to evaluate the effects of their decisions in an interlinked multi-species and multi-gear fishery – such as anticipating the effect of displaced fishing effort.

I joined the Australian Antarctic Division in 2010 to focus on ecosystem modelling and management strategy evaluations for Southern Ocean toothfish fisheries. By using a model framework to simulate all processes around fishing – from the dynamics of fish populations to the effects of fishing, the data collection and stock assessment, and the fisheries management decisions – my work aims to improve the scientific information and management advice to the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR).

I am particularly interested in the effects of fishing on fish populations and the wider ecosystem, approaches to improve assessments and the management of fish stocks, and human aspects of fishing such as fisher behaviour and the dynamics of fishing fleets.

Current projects

International collaborations

Key outcome areas

  • Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR)
  • Management and research strategies for Australia’s sub-Antarctic fisheries.

Related links

Selected publications

Ziegler PE, Welsford DC, Constable AJ (2011). Evaluating length-frequency data and length-based performance indicators in new and exploratory fisheries. CCAMLR Science 18: 57–73.

Leporati SC, Ziegler PE, Semmens JM (2009). Assessing the stock status of holobenthic octopus fisheries: is CPUE data enough? ICES Journal of Marine Sciences 66: 478–487.

Brown CJ, Hobday AJ, Ziegler PE, Welsford DC (2008). Models of fishery-driven evolution predict impacts on sustainability of wild fisheries. Marine Ecology Progress Series 369: 257–266.

Ziegler PE, Lyle JM, Haddon M, Ewing GP (2007). Rapid changes in life-history characteristics of a long-lived temperate reef fish. Marine and Freshwater Research 58:1096–1107.

Ewing GP, Lyle JM, Murphy RJ, Kalish JM, Ziegler PE (2007). Age validation based on otolith structure, oxytetracycline and bomb radiocarbon methods in a long-lived temperate reef fish, Cheilodactylus spectabilis. Marine and Freshwater Research 58: 944–955.

Ziegler PE, Haddon M, Frusher SD, Johnson CR (2004). Modelling seasonal catchability of the southern rock lobster Jasus edwardsii by water temperature, moulting and mating. Marine Biology 145: 179–190.

Ziegler PE, Frusher SD, Johnson CR (2003).Environmental, physiological and density-dependent processes determine catchability of the southern rock lobster Jasus edwardsii in different regions of the Tasmanian fishery. Fisheries Research 61: 107–123.

Ziegler PE, Frusher SD, Johnson CR, Gardner C (2002). Catchability of the southern rock lobster Jasus edwardsii: I. Effects of sex, season and catch history. Marine and Freshwater Research 53: 1143–1148.

Ziegler PE, Johnson CR, Frusher SD (2002). Catchability of the southern rock lobster Jasus edwardsii: II. Effects of size. Marine and Freshwater Research 53: 1149–1158.